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Greening Horsham. EcoFair press release1 Oct 2011

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Energy prices have risen by 21% since last year…

That’s £244 for the average household! Find practical money saving solutions at the Home & Business energy “Eco Fair” on Saturday 22nd October at County Hall North, Chart Way, Horsham RH12 1XA. 10am ‘til 4pm.

With the current global downturn and spending cuts biting, we are all likely to be feeling the pinch, so Greening Horsham’s Energy Eco fair couldn’t be more timely. There’s a whole raft of initiatives out there to help reduce our dependence on fossil fuels and see our bills fall, but they can seem pretty confusing. From the very simplest (and free) measures, like closing curtains or blinds at night, draft proofing and insulation, right up to installing solar panels on your roof to generate your own electricity, there are things absolutely EVERYONE can do reduce their bills significantly. While the issues surrounding our dependence on fossil fuels certainly have profound environmental significance, they also affect us much closer to home - literally in our homes!

The Feed-in Tariff for domestic solar PV installations (the money you get for creating your own electricity and selling it back to the National grid) is to be reviewed next April. It is predicted the tariffs will be reduced significantly, so now is certainly the time to consider PV installation. Once installed, the current tariffs are then guaranteed for 25 years!

Whether you are considering any of these projects for your home or business, or just interested to find out more, the Eco Fair will give you the information you need brought all together under one roof. The Eco Fair model has run very successfully in many locations across Sussex and further afield for several years, but it’s over four years since the last event in Horsham. It brings together a number of businesses offering a wide range of schemes - solar PV, insulation, Smart meters, wood burning & biomass boilers etc., industry specialists, and local residents, some of whom have undertaken these initiatives in their own homes. It’s a chance to chat informally (over coffee & cakes!), get the practical information you need to help you decide what scheme might work best for you, as well as how to make it happen. In addition to stalls, exhibitions and real people with real experience on hand to chat to, there will be a programme of speakers all day (programme in advance on our website) covering topics including the “Green Deal”, Solar PV tariffs,
Community energy schemes, Wood fuel heating & LED lighting.

The event will be opened at 10am by Claire Vickers, Chair of Horsham District Council who along with West Sussex County Council is actively supporting the EcoFair. Greening Horsham hopes to build on this event by running other EcoFairs in the future covering a range of environmental topics.

Greening Horsham website www.greeninghorsham.org.uk. Phone 07941 338169

 

News from the Eco Fair

 

Biomass

Biomass systems create heat by burning wood or straw, or by processing food- or farm waste to create biogas which can then be burned or used a fuel for a generator to create electricity.

Systems which burn wood vary from open fires burning logs, through log burning stoves and boilers, to systems which burn wood chips or pellets either for heat or to power a generator. They can heat a single room or provide both heat and electricity for a community.

Food and farm wastes are used in an anaerobic digestion process which creates biogas and a fertiliser. The biogas can be burned or used to run a generator, or it can be processed further and put into the gas grid.

Heat Pumps

Heat pumps work in the same way as a refrigerator. Just as your fridge or freezer pumps heat from inside the fridge out to the room in order to cool your food or ice cream, then a heat pump works by pumping heat from the ground or air into your house to keep it warm.

Air-source heat pumps take heat from the air around a building, working rather like air conditioners running backwards.

Ground-source heat pumps rely on the ground temperature below 2m depth being more or less constant all year. You do need either a series of very deep boreholes or a large area to collect heat from.